University of Leicester’s Centre for Urban History: Leicester now has a unique branding strategy that is the envy of cities around the world

City now has unique brand that appeals worldwide, according to University of Leicester urban history researcher

LEICESTER, 18-May-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — “Within this globalised world, where branding strategies are being replicated in across different cities, Leicester now possesses a unique promotional springboard that is the envy of the world.” – Inès Hassen, PhD researcher at the Centre for Urban History

With an historic Premier League trophy to its name, Leicester now has a unique branding strategy that is the envy of cities around the world.

That is according to Inès Hassen, a PhD researcher at the Centre for Urban History at the University of Leicester, who has been conducting research on Leicester’s economic and urban change in the age of globalisation for the past four years.

She argues in a new opinion piece that the Premier League success of Leicester City Football Club, coupled with the University of Leicester’s discovery of Richard III, has boosted the city’s branding strategy by providing it with the final selling point to make it truly unique.

Inès said: “Within this globalised world, where branding strategies are being replicated in across different cities, Leicester now possesses a unique promotional springboard that is the envy of the world.

“The international press is talking about Leicester as Premier League ‘campioni’ with references too to its multicultural and historical identity. The city’s champion image is a creative vehicle for promoting Leicester’s philosophy of multicultural tolerance to the rest of the world.

“Leicester, surprisingly, may have become a global model for multicultural cooperation. And what is certain is that the city can position itself confidently as a champion of globalisation: a medium-sized city that has the world at its feet.”

Describing Leicester as the ‘sporting capital with cultural capital’, Inès argues that the city’s strength lies in embracing its diversity and celebrating its residents’ cultural heritage.

Inès adds: “Leicester is considered to be Britain’s most diverse city, re-shaped by migration flows from the Caribbean in the 1940s-50s and from the Indian-sub continent in the 1960s. The city also welcomed in the 1970s many persecuted Asian families displaced from East Africa.

“Distinct migration groups have contributed to Leicester’s business development thanks to their trade expertise – and this has attracted praise from the Leicestershire Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The city is proud of its cultural diversity and Leicester has drawn its strength from its migration history.

“The promotion of numerous ethnic festivals, such as Diwali and the Caribbean Carnival, reflects the city’s positive approach towards multiculturalism and the public expression of diversity. Ethnic minorities are the driving force behind the city’s social cohesion and urban development.

“Leicester, a city located in the middle of England, has acquired a central presence on the global map. Leicester, a reserved and medium-sized post-industrial city, is truly a city of surprises.”

Ends

Notes to editors:

For more information contact Inès Hassen on ih64@le.ac.uk

Comments are closed.